Shrimp are the base for a true Creole JambalayaAurora Catering's

Creole Shrimp & Sausage Jambalaya
Yield - 2 - 1/2 Gallons

Ingredients
1 TBSP PEANUT OIL
3 LBS SMOKED SAUSAGE (Sliced) (Hot or mild, your choice)
2 LBS ONIONS (Diced)
1/2 LBS BELL PEPPER (Diced)
1/2 LBS CELERY (Chopped)
1 -1/2 TBSP MINCED FRESH GARLIC
1 SPRIG WHOLE FRESH THYME
8 LEAVES FRESH BASIL
1/2 TSP BLACK PEPPER
1 -1/2 TSP LOUISIANA (CAYENNE BASED) HOT SAUCE
16 OZ TOMATO SAUCE
2 -1/2 QUARTS SHRIMP STOCK (see recipe)
5 LBS FRESH SHRIMP (26 to 30 count shrimp, peeled, divined) (no smaller than these)
1- 3/4 QUARTS LOUISIANA LONG GRAIN RICE

Method
Heat 10 quart Dutch oven over medium/high heat for 2-3 minutes before adding oil, this will eliminate oil from popping and splattering. Add the sausage and brown (about 15 minutes) or until all sides are a brown color. This is very important, for a thick amount of "graton" should form on the bottom of the Dutch oven. This is where the color an flavor of a true jambalaya is achieved. Strain excess grease.

Add the onions, bell pepper, and celery to de-glaze the bottom of the oven, reduce heat and simmer until onions are soft (About 20 minutes). Add garlic, thyme, basil, pepper and hot sauce and simmer an additional 5 minutes.

Add tomato sauce and stock, and simmer for 20 minutes. Increase heat to high and fold in the shrimp. Bring the jambalaya to a boil (this will turn the shrimp pink, thereby cooking them, but not over cooking them).

Taste the “jambalaya stock” (it should be slightly overly seasoned since the rice will absorb the flavors) adjust the stock as needed. I have found that the fresh herbs might be needed here. Fresh herb flavor can be cooked out of a pot, so this is the time to add more if needed.

Add rice, bring pot back to a boil, stirring to insure that rice does not stick to the bottom of the Dutch oven. Reduce heat to the very lowest setting.  Cover with tight fitting lid (do not remove lid for 30 minutes). Open Dutch oven, gently fold jambalaya, recover and allow to steam for an additional 10 minutes. Serve.

Alternate Method

You can add almost any kind of shellfish to the jambalaya.  Such as,  cleaned and halved blue point crabs, mussels or clams. The mussels and clams should be trimmed of beards (mussels), and checked to insure that they are alive when placed in the pot.  You add them at the end of the cooking.  Once you add the rice, bring it up to a boil and allow it to start to rise. THEN add the shellfish. Push them into the stock and rice. COVER and DO NOT LIFT THE LID, as above. Fold and simmer for an additional 10 minutes.

Plate Presentation
Serve the jambalaya straight from the pot. It is beautiful in presentation and will retain the heat well for seconds.

On the table have on hand Louisiana hot sauce and a cayenne vinegar bottle.

Chef's Notes:
Shrimp stock is made by boiling the shrimp heads and shells in seafood boiling water. Then straining the shells from the stock. Since the stock can become highly seasoned this recipe is intentionally under seasoned to allow the chef to adjust before adding the rice. There are many recipes for jambalaya but this is the one I used to win the Jean Lafitte Seafood Jambalaya Cooking Contest in 1981, 83, 85, 89, and ‘92.

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Chef Emile L. Stieffel, Aurora Catering, Inc. email address: ChefEmile@CustomCatering.net
Copyright 1995 Aurora Catering, Inc. All rights reserved.
Revised: May 15, 2008.